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Our Services

How We Help

Cognitive Care and Counseling offers a variety of services to help our clients achieve their mental health goals. 

EMDR

A psychotherapy technique that helps you process and heal from trauma and distressing life experiences through guided eye movement and other forms of bilateral stimulation.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

A form of psychotherapy that aims to change patterns of thinking or behavior that cause problems in your life in order to alter the way you feel  and help you with self-awareness.

Humanistic Therapy 

A client-centered approach to therapy that emphasizes personal growth, self-actualization, and self-healing through empathy.

Mindfulness Therapy

A therapeutic approach incorporating mindfulness practices to help you focus on the present moment, reduce stress, and enhance emotional regulations and self-awareness.

Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy 

Combines cognitive behavioral techniques and mindfulness practices to help you prevent the reoccurrence of depression and manage negative thought patterns. 

Narrative Therapy 

A form of psychotherapy that helps you reshape your identity and experiences by exploring, understanding, and re-authoring the stories you tell about your life.

Person-Centered Therapy

A humanistic approach that creates a non-judgmental, empathetic, and supportive therapeutic environment to foster self-exploration and personal growth.

Internal Family Systems Therapy 

A form of therapy designed to help you identify and harmonize your internal “parts” or sub-personalities fostering self-awareness and self-compassion.

Motivational Interviewing

Counseling that enhances motivation and commitment to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence through empathetic and collaborative dialogue.

Specialties & Areas of Expertise

Alzheimer's

Chronic Illness

Ambiguous Loss

Anxiety

Codependency

Coping Skills

Depression

Emotional Disturbance

Family Conflict

Geriatric and Seniors

Grief and loss

Life Transitions

Relationship Issues

Self Esteem

Stress

Trauma and PTSD

How it Works

Who We Help

Care Partner ​of loved ones with Dementia 

 

Being a care partner for someone living with dementia is difficult. Cognitive Care Collective is here to help you through the challenges many care partners face like feeling lonely, exhausted, and overwhelmed. Our practice is designed to help you feel supported seen, and valued. ​

 

Therapy helps care partners understand the progression of dementia, set realistic expectations, and develop practical caregiving skills. We work on stress management techniques to prevent caregiver burnout. We also guide you through maintaining a healthy balance between caregiving and personal needs. By addressing these aspects, care partners can enhance their well-being and provide more effective support to their loved ones. 

Coping with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

 

Dealing with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is challenging and is bound to evoke a range of emotions, from confusion and frustration to anxiety and sadness. Cognitive Care Collective helps individuals navigate these feelings by providing a supportive and empathetic environment.

 

Therapy can be immensely beneficial in managing MCI. We offer strategies to enhance cognitive function, improve memory, and adapt to changes. Together, we build routines and employ cognitive exercises that stimulate the brain. Emotional support is equally crucial; acknowledging and validating feelings of loss and fear is therapeutic. We aim to enhance overall well-being, ensuring no one feels alone on this journey.

Navigating Life Transitions as an Older Adult ​

 

Being an older adult going through life transitions, such as retirement, loss of a spouse, or relocating is life-changing. These experiences can make you feel uncertainty, grief, and anxiety. At Cognitive Care Collective we provide a compassionate and supportive space to help older adults process these changes.

 

We work together to explore these emotions, build resilience, and discover new sources of meaning and fulfillment. Practical strategies, such as setting new goals, engaging in social activities, and fostering hobbies,  can enhance your well-being. We hope to help older adults reframe their experiences and adapt to new circumstances, so they lead satisfying and enriched lives despite the changes.

Who We Help

Care Partner ​of Loved Ones with Dementia 

 

Being a care partner for someone living with dementia is difficult. Cognitive Care and Counseling is here to help you through the challenges many care partners face like feeling lonely, exhausted, and overwhelmed. Our practice is designed to help you feel supported seen, and valued. ​

 

Therapy helps care partners understand the progression of dementia, set realistic expectations, and develop practical caregiving skills. We work on stress management techniques to prevent caregiver burnout. We also guide you through maintaining a healthy balance between caregiving and personal needs. By addressing these aspects, care partners can enhance their well-being and provide more effective support to their loved ones. 

Coping with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

 

Dealing with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is challenging and is bound to evoke a range of emotions, from confusion and frustration to anxiety and sadness. Cognitive Care and Counseling helps individuals navigate these feelings by providing a supportive and empathetic environment.

 

Therapy can be immensely beneficial in managing MCI. We offer strategies to enhance cognitive function, improve memory, and adapt to changes. Together, we build routines and employ cognitive exercises that stimulate the brain. Emotional support is equally crucial; acknowledging and validating feelings of loss and fear is therapeutic. We aim to enhance overall well-being, ensuring no one feels alone on this journey.

Navigating Life Transitions as an Older Adult ​

 

Being an older adult going through life transitions, such as retirement, loss of a spouse, or relocating is life-changing. These experiences can make you feel uncertainty, grief, and anxiety. At Cognitive Care and Counseling we provide a compassionate and supportive space to help older adults process these changes.

 

We work together to explore these emotions, build resilience, and discover new sources of meaning and fulfillment. Practical strategies, such as setting new goals, engaging in social activities, and fostering hobbies,  can enhance your well-being. We hope to help older adults reframe their experiences and adapt to new circumstances, so they lead satisfying and enriched lives despite the changes.

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Does this sound like you?

Are you feeling overwhelmed by the responsibilities of caregiving?

Do you feel like dementia has taken your loved one away from you?

Are you experiencing conflicts with your loved one or other family members?

Have you stopped participating in activities you once enjoyed because of caregiving?

Do you feel sad, hopeless, or frustrated?

Do you feel like you're constantly dealing with crisis situations?

Is it challenging for you or your loved one to adjust to a recent loss or a dementia diagnosis?

Would your loved one benefit from speaking with a therapist or joining a support group for individuals with memory issues?

Please know that you are not alone.

We understand the challenges that come with caring for a loved one with dementia. Our counselors specialize in helping care partners manage the practical and emotional aspects of caregiving.

Who Would Benefit?

Many care partners find it helpful to speak with a trained professional throughout the caregiving journey.

Look out for signs that it may be time to consider therapy or counseling if you're experiencing:

Anger or frustration

You find yourself more irritable than usual, even small things bother you.

Fear

You're afraid of making mistakes that could harm your loved one or yourself, and you may struggle with sleep.

Guilt

You feel guilty for wanting time for yourself, thinking it's selfish to have personal needs.

Stress

You feel like you're carrying the weight of the world on your shoulders, experiencing physical symptoms like back pain or stomach issues

Depression

You feel persistent sadness, find it hard to shake off the blues, and may feel like crying often.

Isolation or Loneliness

Even though you know others are care partners too, you feel alone in your responsibilities

Anxiety

Your worries have increased, and you may doubt yourself at times.

Grief or Sadness

Anticipating the loss of your loved one can lead to feelings of sadness and unfairness about their suffering.

Physical Strain or Exhaustion

Simple tasks feel like a struggle, and even a full night's sleep doesn't refresh you.

Why Caregiver Therapy? 

Caregiver therapy helps prevent or alleviate issues such as:

Burn Out

Feeling emotionally exhausted and disconnected from your loved one.

Sleep Problems & Fatigue 

Difficulty falling or staying asleep, extreme fatigue affecting daily life.

Substance Abuse

Turning to alcohol, medication, or other substances to cope with stress and exhaustion.

Physical Health Conditions

Aches, pains, headaches, stomach problems, and breathing difficulties.

Headaches

Tension, cluster, or migraine headaches that become more frequent and severe.

Worsening Pre-Existing Illnesses

Conditions like hypertension or diabetes may worsen despite medication.

Weakened Immune System

 Increased susceptibility to illness due to chronic stress.

​How Does Therapy Help?

Therapy or counseling with a skilled professional provides emotional support and a safe space to:

Make sense of your emotions.

Realize that others are going through similar experiences, bringing relief.

Identify areas for improvement.

Prevent burnout and improve communication with your loved ones.​

​Discuss uncomfortable topics.

Address issues you may not feel comfortable discussing with family or friends.

 

Receive tips.

Gain valuable feedback to make better decisions and prioritize self-care.​

Develop healthier relationships.

Learn strategies for healthier relationships with your loved ones and yourself.

To learn more about how therapy can help you reach out for support.

This is a supervised private practice. It is owned by a master's level, non-independent licensee under Board-approved clinical supervision pursuant to A.A.C. R4-6-211.

The Board- approved clinical supervisor of this practice is: Venessa De La Cruz, LCSW 1166 E. Warner Rd. Suite 203 Gilbert, AZ. 85296 (480)223-8817

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